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dc.contributor.authorO'Rafferty, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T12:15:40Z
dc.date.available2017-12-06T12:15:40Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-25
dc.identifier.citationSimon O'Rafferty, 'Moving Towards the Circular Economy in Ireland', [report], National Economic and Social Council, 2017-10-25, Council report (National Economic and Social Council), 144, October 2017en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/82053
dc.description.abstractThere is increasing recognition of the potential benefits for economies and societies of moving away from a ‘make-use-dispose’ model towards adopting a circular economy, thereby maximising resource efficiency and environmental protection. A circular economy is one in which we keep resources in use for as long as possible, extract the maximum value from them whilst in use, then recover and regenerate products and materials at the end of each service life. It is an economy that is restorative and regenerative by design, and which aims to keep products, components and materials at their highest utility and value at all times, distinguishing between technical and biological cycles (Ellen MacArthur Foundation, 2015a). A fully circular economy requires a systemic and transformative approach to production and consumption that effectively designs out waste and keeps materials and resulting products in use for as long as possible (World Economic Forum, 2015). A key building block for the circular economy is resource efficiency and efforts to reduce waste. Ireland’s policy on waste management, A Resource Opportunity: Waste Management in Ireland (DECLG, 2012) focuses on resource efficiency and the virtual elimination of landfilling of municipal waste. The National Waste Prevention Programme (NWPP) as well as many other actions relating to waste, water and energy resource efficiency- including, the EPA’s Be Green Programme, and Regional Waste Management Plans—are also integral to the development of Ireland’s circular economy. The circular economy is also closely linked to the bioeconomy. Many bio-based materials are renewable, biodegradable and compostable and, when due care and attention is focused on their lifecycle, environmental impacts and sustainable sourcing, they can become the basis for important circularity in an economy. The bioeconomy is thus increasingly being seen as the biological engine of the circular economy (European Commission, 2015c) The circular economy is also a key means of working towards more long-term sustainable economic, social and environmental development. However, it is important to note that increased circularity will need to be supported by efforts to reduce and eliminate materials and practices that have negative environmental impacts (such as carbon emissions). In 2016, NESC commissioned Dr Simon O’Rafferty to conduct a short research project on the circular economy in Ireland, as part of its sustainability remit and with support from the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment. The purpose of this work was to identify and document case studies of circular economy practices in Ireland and to examine some of the key enablers and barriers to their further development. The purpose of these Council Comments is to introduce the research report and make some observations, both in relation to its findings and the circular economy more broadly. This paper is structured as follows. It first provides an overview of the international and national policy context for the circular economy. It then notes the NESC research and work undertaken in this area before outlining four Council reflections on the transition for Ireland towards a circular economy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Economic and Social Councilen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectCircular Economy in Irelanden
dc.subjectResource efficiencyen
dc.subjectSustainabilityen
dc.titleMoving Towards the Circular Economy in Irelanden
dc.typereporten
dc.type.supercollectionedepositireland
dc.contributor.corporatenameNational Economic and Social Councilen
dc.publisher.placeirelanden
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.relation.ispartofseriesdateOctober 2017en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesissue144en
dc.relation.ispartofseriestitleCouncil report (National Economic and Social Council)en


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