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dc.contributor.authorWatson, Dorothy
dc.contributor.authorGrotti, Raffaele
dc.contributor.authorBertrand, Maître
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Christopher T.
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-22T12:26:19Z
dc.date.available2018-02-22T12:26:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-31
dc.identifier.citationDorothy Watson, Raffaele Grotti, Maître Bertrand, Christopher T. Whelan, 'Poverty Dynamics of Social Risk Groups in the EU: an analysis of the EU Statistics on Income and Living Conditions, 2005 to 2014', [report], Department of Social Protection. Social Inclusion Division, ESRI, 2018-01-31, Social Inclusion Report Series, 1, 7, January 2018en
dc.identifier.isbn9781908109460
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/82533
dc.descriptionThis paper draws on the EU-SILC dataset to investigate changes over the period 2004 to 2014 in the trends and dynamics in poverty for social risk groups in selected European countries representing different welfare regimes (Social democratic, Corporatist, Liberal and Southern). Social risk groups differ in the challenges they face to their capacity to convert resources (such as capital and skills) into desired outcomes (goods and services). They include lone parents, adults with a disability, young adults, children, older adults and the reference group of other working-age adults. The comparative element of the project allowed us to assess whether certain welfare regimes were better at protecting more vulnerable groups. We address three research questions: Do the same social risk groups face higher risks of poverty (and greater persistence of poverty) in all countries? Is the ‘social risk gap’ – the difference in poverty across groups – larger in countries like Ireland than in Social democratic countries like Sweden? Did the recession lead to polarisation between the vulnerable social risk groups and other working-age adults? We find that lone parents and families of working-age adults with a disability experience higher deprivation and poverty rates across all countries. Ireland, along with the other Liberal regime country, the UK, stood out as having poorer outcomes for the vulnerable groups, especially in terms of material deprivation. There was some evidence of polarisation over time in Ireland and the UK to the detriment of the vulnerable groups. This was not a pattern found across most countries, however.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Social Protection. Social Inclusion Division, ESRIen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectPovertyen
dc.subjectDeprivationen
dc.subjectPoverty dynamicsen
dc.subjectPersistent povertyen
dc.subjectSocial risk groupsen
dc.subjectRecessionen
dc.subjectComparativeen
dc.subjectEuropean Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditionsen
dc.titlePoverty Dynamics of Social Risk Groups in the EU: an analysis of the EU Statistics on Income and Living Conditions, 2005 to 2014en
dc.title.alternativeAn analysis of the EU Statistics on Income and Living Conditions, 2005 to 2014en
dc.typereporten
dc.type.supercollectionedepositireland
dc.contributor.corporatenameIreland. Social Inclusion Divisionen
dc.contributor.corporatenameEconomic and Social Research Instituteen
dc.publisher.placeirelanden
dc.rights.ecaccessrightsopenAccess
dc.relation.ispartofseriesdateJanuary 2018en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesissue7en
dc.relation.ispartofseriestitleSocial Inclusion Report Seriesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesvolume1en


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